Advertisement
If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Home Who's Online Today's Posts HP Calculator CompD Gift Shop Mark Forums Read
Go Back   Competition Diesel.Com - Bringing The BEST Together > The Entrance Gate- Welcome to Competition Diesel > Competition Events and Get-Togethers > Diesels for Christ
Register Members List Timeslips EFI Live Library Invite Your Friends FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-29-2017, 09:03 AM   #2081
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Trial by Fire

Read: James 1:1–12 | Bible in a Year: Judges 7–8; Luke 5:1–16

Blessed is the one who perseveres under trial because, having stood the test, that person will receive the crown of life. James 1:12

Last winter while visiting a natural history museum in Colorado, I learned some remarkable facts about the aspen tree. An entire grove of slender, white-trunked aspens can grow from a single seed and share the same root system. These root systems can exist for thousands of years whether or not they produce trees. They sleep underground, waiting for fire, flood, or avalanche to clear a space for them in the shady forest. After a natural disaster has cleared the land, aspen roots can sense the sun at last. The roots send up saplings, which become trees.

For aspens, new growth is made possible by the devastation of a natural disaster. James writes that our growth in faith is also made possible by difficulties. “Consider it pure joy,” he writes, “whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything” (James 1:2–4).

Trials and tests can draw us closer to Christ.
It’s difficult to be joyful during trials, but we can take hope from the fact that God will use difficult circumstances to help us reach maturity. Like aspen trees, faith can grow in times of trial when difficulty clears space in our hearts for the light of God to touch us.

Thank You, God, for being with us in our trials, and for helping us to grow through difficult circumstances.

Trials and tests can draw us closer to Christ.

INSIGHT:
James says trials will reveal whether our faith is genuine (James 1:3), and will strengthen and mature us (v. 4). The apostle Paul also believed that suffering is beneficial. He said, “we can rejoice . . . when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they help us develop endurance. And endurance develops strength of character, and character strengthens our confident hope of salvation. And this hope will not lead to disappointment” (Rom. 5:3–5 nlt). Read James 1:12 and consider what’s in store for those who endure testing through faith in Jesus.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2017, 12:03 PM   #2082
estrada5.9
 
estrada5.9's Avatar

Name: estrada5.9
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Williston, ND
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 1,910
That is a interesting fact about Aspen trees.

Book of James, full of awesome.
__________________
98 QCLB
10 CCSB
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2017, 08:34 AM   #2083
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Life and Death

Read: Genesis 50:22–26 | Bible in a Year: Judges 9–10; Luke 5:17–39

I am about to die. But God will surely come to your aid. Genesis 50:24

I will never forget sitting at the bedside of my friend’s brother when he died; the scene was one of the ordinary visited by the extraordinary. Three of us were talking quietly when we realized that Richard’s breathing was becoming more labored. We gathered around him, watching, waiting, and praying. When he took his last breath, it felt like a holy moment; the presence of God enveloped us in the midst of our tears over a wonderful man dying in his forties.

Many of the heroes of our faith experienced God’s faithfulness when they died. For instance, Jacob announced he would soon be “gathered to [his] people” (Gen. 49:29–33). Jacob’s son Joseph also announced his impending death: “I am about to die,” he said to his brothers while instructing them how to hold firm in their faith. He seems to be at peace, yet eager that his brothers trust the Lord (50:24).

We can believe the promise that Jesus will prepare a place for us in His Father’s house.
None of us knows when or how we will breathe our last breath, but we can ask God to help us trust that He will be with us. We can believe the promise that Jesus will prepare a place for us in His Father’s house (John 14:2–3).

Lord God, Your dwelling place will be with Your people, and You will be our God, wiping away our tears and banishing death. May it be so!

The Lord will never abandon us, especially at the time of our death.

INSIGHT:
Genesis, the book of beginnings, concludes with important endings. At the beginning of chapter 50, we find one of the Old Testament’s greatest examples, Joseph, weeping over the death of his father, Jacob. The chapter ends with Joseph’s death and burial. In between, three key events take place. First, Joseph takes his father’s remains back to Canaan to their familial home. This marks Joseph’s first return to the land since the dark days of Genesis 37, when his brothers sold him into slavery. Second, Joseph reassures them of his love and forgiveness by affirming God’s purposes and his own desire to care for his brothers and their families (50:19–21). Third, Joseph, anticipating death, again reminds the Israelites of their proper home in Canaan by asking that they take his bones to be buried in the land of promise. These ideas prepare the way for the exodus—God’s eventual rescue of Israel from bondage in Egypt more than 400 years later.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2017, 08:43 AM   #2084
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
The Greatest Invitation

Read: Isaiah 55:1–7 | Bible in a Year: Judges 11–12; Luke 6:1–26

Come, all you who are thirsty, come to the waters; and you who have no money, come, buy and eat! Isaiah 55:1

During a recent week, I received several invitations in the mail. Those inviting me to attend “free” seminars on retirement, real estate, and life insurance were immediately thrown away. But the invitation to a gathering honoring a longtime friend caused me to reply immediately, “Yes! I accept.” Invitation + Desire = Acceptance.

Isaiah 55:1 is one of the great invitations in the Bible. The Lord said to His people who were in difficult circumstances, “Come, all you who are thirsty, come to the waters; and you who have no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without cost.” This is God’s remarkable offer of inner nourishment, deep spiritual satisfaction, and everlasting life (vv. 2–3).

Lord Jesus, thank You for Your promise of mercy, forgiveness, and eternal life.
Jesus’s invitation is repeated in the last chapter of the Bible: “The Spirit and the bride say, ‘Come!’ And let the one who hears say, ‘Come!’ Let the one who is thirsty come; and let the one who wishes take the free gift of the water of life” (Rev. 22:17).

We often think of eternal life as beginning when we die. In reality, it begins when we receive Jesus Christ as our Savior and Lord.

God’s invitation to find eternal life in Him is the greatest invitation of all! Invitation + Desire = Acceptance.

Lord Jesus, thank You for Your promise of mercy, pardon, and eternal life. I acknowledge my failures and receive Jesus as my Savior today.

When we accept Jesus’s invitation to follow Him, our whole life changes direction.

INSIGHT:
In Isaiah 55, the prophet draws on the imagery of a royal banquet to give discouraged Judeans hope that, despite their suffering, God’s promises to them remained trustworthy. In the background of Isaiah 55 is God’s promise of an eternal covenant with the line of David (Ps. 89:28–29). Isaiah’s report broadens God’s promise to the line of David even further, depicting a royal feast where all Judeans share the kingly role of representing Yahweh to the nations (55:3–5). When Jesus came, He said He was the ultimate fulfillment of Isaiah’s promise (John 7:37) and invited everyone, especially the forgotten and marginalized, to His feast (Matt. 22:1–14). Through His Spirit, Jesus’s followers can enjoy Christ’s abundant life and, as His representatives, invite all the world to the banquet. Who might you invite to the feast?
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2017, 09:14 AM   #2085
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
A Heart of Compassion

Read: Colossians 3:12–17 | Bible in a Year: Judges 19–21; Luke 7:31–50

Clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. Colossians 3:12

Seven of us were attending a musical production at a crowded amusement park. Wanting to sit together, we tried to squeeze into one row. But as we did, a woman rushed between us. My wife mentioned to her that we wanted to stay together, but the woman quickly said, “Too bad,” as she and her two companions pushed on into the row.

As three of us sat one row behind the other four, my wife, Sue, noticed that the woman had an adult with her who appeared to have special needs. She had been trying to keep her little group together so she could take care of her friend. Suddenly, our irritation faded. Sue said, “Imagine how tough things are for her in a crowded place like this.” Yes, perhaps the woman did respond rudely. But we could respond with compassion rather than anger.

Compassion is understanding the troubles of others.
Wherever we go, we will encounter people who need compassion. Perhaps these words from the apostle Paul can help us view everyone around us in a different light—as people who need the gentle touch of grace. “As God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience” (Col. 3:12). He also suggests that we “bear with each other and forgive one another” (v. 13).

As we show compassion, we will be pointing others to the One who poured out His heart of grace and compassion on us.

Your compassions never fail, Father. May we mirror Your heart by showing compassion to others.

Compassion is understanding the troubles of others.

INSIGHT:
Compassion is not just feeling pity for a needy person; our emotions must move us to relieve the misery of that person. The apostle Paul calls us to “be kind and compassionate to one another” (Eph. 4:32) and “to follow God’s example” (5:1). Jesus commands us to be “compassionate, just as your Father is compassionate” (Luke 6:36 nlt). In one of the greatest self-revelations in the Bible, God described Himself as “the compassionate and gracious God” (Ex. 34:6). We echo with the apostle James, “The Lord is full of compassion and mercy” (James 5:11).

Imagine a world without compassion. What would it be like? How is showing compassion essential for God’s children?
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2017, 09:15 AM   #2086
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
His Word the Last Word

Read: Psalm 63:1–11 | Bible in a Year: Ruth 1–4; Luke 8:1–25

On my bed I remember you; I think of you through the watches of the night. Because you are my help, I sing in the shadow of your wings. Psalm 63:6–7

Dawson Trotman, a dynamic Christian leader of the mid-twentieth century and founder of The Navigators, emphasized the importance of the Bible in the life of every Christian. Trotman ended each day with a practice he called “His Word the last word.” Before going to sleep he meditated on a memorized Bible verse or passage, then prayed about its place and influence in his life. He wanted the last words he thought about each day to be God’s words.

The psalmist David wrote, “On my bed I remember you; I think of you through the watches of the night. Because you are my help, I sing in the shadow of your wings” (Ps. 63:6–7). Whether we are in great difficulty or enjoying a time of peace, our last thought at night can ease our minds with the rest and comfort God gives. It may also set the tone for our first thought the next morning.

Because you are my help, I sing in the shadow of your wings. Psalm 63:7
A friend and his wife conclude each day by reading aloud a Bible passage and daily devotional with their four children. They welcome questions and thoughts from each child and talk about what it means to follow Jesus at home and school. They call it their version of “His Word the last word” for each day.

What better way to end our day!

Thank You Father, for Your Word in our hearts and our minds—our last thought at night as we rest securely in You.


Do you have a favorite verse you have committed to memory? Share it on Facebook.com/ourdailybread.




The Spirit of God renews our minds when we meditate on the Word of God.

INSIGHT:
Psalm 63 can encourage us as we reflect on how the psalmist David brought his struggles to God. First, he expressed his thirst for the living God as being like a thirsty man yearning for life-giving water (vv. 1–2). Second, he observed God’s glory in the sanctuary and compared it to eating and being satisfied by delicious and nourishing food (vv. 3–5). Third, even when he was on his bed at night, he meditated on his Creator and Savior and felt the closeness of God’s love (vv. 6–8). Fourth, he trusted God for protection when he encountered real-life enemies (vv. 9–10). Finally, the psalmist admitted that his power didn’t come from his regal position. Instead, it was rooted in the living God who brings joy to the heart and glory to His name (v. 11).

What can we learn from David’s example? Why not spend some time today reflecting on the character of God.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2017, 09:39 AM   #2087
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Kossi’s Courage

Read: 2 Kings 23:12–14, 21–25 | Bible in a Year: 1 Samuel 1–3; Luke 8:26–56

You shall have no other gods before me. . . . You shall not bow down to them or worship them. Exodus 20:3, 5

As he awaited his baptism in Togo’s Mono River, Kossi stooped to pick up a worn wooden carving. His family had worshiped the object for generations. Now they watched as he tossed the grotesque figure into a fire prepared for the occasion. No longer would their choicest chickens be sacrificed to this god.

In the West, most Christians think of idols as metaphors for what they put in place of God. In Togo, West Africa, idols represent literal gods that must be appeased with sacrifice. Idol burning and baptism make a courageous statement about a new believer’s allegiance to the one true God.

You shall have no other gods before me. Exodus 20:3
As an eight-year-old, King Josiah came to power in an idol-worshiping, sex-obsessed culture. His father and grandfather had been two of the worst kings in all of Judah’s sordid history. Then the high priest discovered the book of the law. When the young king heard its words, he took them to heart (2 Kings 22:8–13). Josiah destroyed the pagan altars, burned the vile items dedicated to the goddess Asherah, and stopped the ritual prostitution (ch. 23). In place of these practices, he celebrated the Passover (23:21–23).

Whenever we look for answers apart from God—consciously or subconsciously—we pursue a false god. It would be wise to ask ourselves: What idols, literal or figurative, do we need to throw on the fire?

Lord, forgive us for those things we turn to that show our hearts are not focused on You. Show us what we need to give up, and replace it with the presence of Your Holy Spirit.

Dear children, keep yourselves from idols. 1 John 5:21

INSIGHT:
Ask God to help you see false trusts that are robbing you of the joy of living in the presence and joy of the One whose mercy and love are more real and sure than the air we breathe.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 08:31 AM   #2088
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
What Lasts Forever?

Read: Psalm 102:25–28 | Bible in a Year: 1 Samuel 4–6; Luke 9:1–17

You remain the same, and your years will never end. Psalm 102:27

My friend, who had gone through many difficulties recently, wrote, “As I reflect on the past four semesters of student life, so many things have changed . . . . It is scary, really scary. Nothing stays forever.”

Indeed, many things can happen in two years—a career change, newfound friendship, illness, death. Good or bad, a life-altering experience may be lurking just around the corner, waiting to pounce! We simply don’t know. What great comfort, then, to know that our loving heavenly Father does not change.

Lord, You are the One who never changes, and You are so good to us.
The psalmist says, “You remain the same, and your years will never end” (Ps. 102:27). The implication of this truth is immense. It means that God is forever loving, just, and wise. As Bible teacher Arthur W. Pink so wonderfully states: “Whatever the attributes of God were before the universe was called into existence, they are precisely the same now, and will remain so forever.”

In the New Testament, James writes, “Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows” (James 1:17). In our changing circumstances, we can be assured that our good God will always be consistent to His character. He is the source of everything good, and everything He does is good.

It may seem that nothing lasts forever, but our God will remain consistently good to those who are His own.

Lord, You are the One who never changes, and You are so good to us. Calm our hearts today with the grace and peace that come only from You.

The One who holds the universe together will not let go of you.

INSIGHT:
Many of the psalms begin with a superscription, a statement preceding the song’s lyrics, that often provides the composer’s name, musical instruction, and/or the events that prompted the psalmist to write. Psalm 102’s superscription reads, “A prayer of an afflicted person who has grown weak and pours out a lament before the Lord.” The author is unnamed but described—“the afflicted.” This season of affliction is so intense that the singer cries out to God for relief. As such, Psalm 102 fits into the psalms of lament. In lament songs, psalmists pour out their fears, hurts, and confusion to God, often wondering when He will meet them in their distress. Psalm 102 does that in verse 2, “Do not hide your face from me when I am in distress. Turn your ear to me.” Clearly, the psalmist’s distress is multiplied by waiting for the Lord’s help. Still, the singer has confident hope in God’s response to his pain (vv. 17–21).
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2017, 09:14 AM   #2089
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Godliman Street

Read: 1 Samuel 9:1–10 | Bible in a Year: 1 Samuel 7–9; Luke 9:18–36

“Look, in this town there is a man of God.” 1 Samuel 9:6

My wife, Carolyn, and I were walking in London and came across a road named Godliman Street. We were told that a man once lived there whose life was so saintly that his street became known as “that godly man’s street.” This reminded me of an Old Testament story.

Saul’s father sent his son and a servant to look for some donkeys that had wandered away. The young men searched for many days but couldn’t find the animals.

Jesus, I want to be close to You and to be a light in my corner of the world.
Saul was ready to give up and go home, but his servant pointed toward Ramah, the prophet Samuel’s village, and replied, “Look, in this town there is a man of God; he is highly respected, and everything he says comes true. Let’s go there now. Perhaps he will tell us what way to take” (1 Sam. 9:6).

Throughout his years and into old age, Samuel had sought friendship and fellowship with God, and his words were weighty with truth. People knew him to be a prophet of the Lord. So Saul and his servant “set out for the town where the man of God was” (v. 10).

Oh, that our lives would so reflect Jesus that we would leave a mark on our neighborhoods, and that the memory of our godliness would linger on!

I'm not sure, Lord, how my neighbors would describe me. But I want to be close to You and to be a light in my corner of the world.


Read God at the Center by going to discoveryseries.org/hp152.

The most powerful testimony is a godly life.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2017, 08:13 AM   #2090
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Our Best Friend

Read: Hebrews 10:19–23 | Bible in a Year: 1 Samuel 15–16; Luke 10:25–42

Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God. John 1:12

When I was twelve years old our family moved to a town in the desert. After gym classes in the hot air at my new school, we rushed for the drinking fountain. Being skinny and young for my grade, I sometimes got pushed out of the way while waiting in line. One day my friend Jose, who was big and strong for his age, saw this happening. He stepped in and stuck out a strong arm to clear my way. “Hey!” he exclaimed, “You let Banks get a drink first!” I never had trouble at the drinking fountain again.

Jesus understood what it was like to face the ultimate unkindness of others. The Bible tells us, “He was despised and rejected by mankind” (Isa. 53:3). But Jesus was not just a victim of suffering, He also became our advocate. By giving His life, Jesus opened a “new and living way” for us to enter into a relationship with God (Heb. 10:20). He did for us what we could never do for ourselves, offering us the free gift of salvation when we repent of our sins and trust in Him.

God’s free gift to us cost Him dearly.
Jesus is the best friend we could ever have. He said, “Whoever comes to me I will never drive away” (John 6:37). Others may hold us at arm’s length or even push us away, but God has opened His arms to us through the cross. How strong is our Savior!

Love’s redeeming work is done, fought the fight, the battle won. Death in vain forbids him rise; Christ has opened paradise. Charles Wesley

God’s free gift to us cost Him dearly.

INSIGHT:
Do you ever wonder whether Jesus knows too much about you to stand up for you the way your best friend would? If such a question gives us pause, could the problem be that we know ourselves too well?

The letter to the Hebrews was an open letter to first-century Jewish readers raised under a system of law and sacrifice that taught them to know their own heart—and to acknowledge their personal wrongs. This letter reminded them that God knew their hearts well enough to see their inclination to slide back into their old religious ways of trying to resolve their sense of sin, shame, and guilty conscience.

So over and over this letter reminds its first readers, and us, of what the Son of God suffered once and for all for all of our sin. Showing His willingness to bear the worst we could do to Him, Jesus prayed, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing” (Luke 23:34). Then to a repentant criminal dying at His side, He said, “Today you will be with me in paradise” (v. 43).

It was one intervention and one sacrifice—for all of us—and for all of our sin.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2017, 09:20 AM   #2091
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Why Forgive?
Read: Luke 23:32–34 | Bible in a Year: 1 Samuel 17–18; Luke 11:1–28

Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.” And they divided up his clothes by casting lots. Luke 23:34

When a friend betrayed me, I knew I would need to forgive her, but I wasn’t sure that I could. Her words pierced deeply inside me, and I felt stunned with pain and anger. Although we talked about it and I told her I forgave her, for a long time whenever I’d see her I felt tinges of hurt, so I knew I still clung to some resentment. One day, however, God answered my prayers and gave me the ability to let go completely. I was finally free.

Forgiveness lies at the heart of the Christian faith, with our Savior extending forgiveness even when He was dying on the cross. Jesus loved those who had nailed Him there, uttering a prayer asking His Father to forgive them. He didn’t hang on to bitterness or anger, but showed grace and love to those who had wronged Him.

Even on the cross, Jesus forgave those who hurt Him.
This is a fitting time to consider before the Lord any people we might need to forgive as we follow Jesus’s example in extending His love to those who hurt us. When we ask God through His Spirit to help us forgive, He will come to our aid—even if we take what we think is a long time to forgive. When we do, we are freed from the prison of unforgiveness.

Lord Jesus Christ, through Your grace and power as You dwell in me, help me to forgive, that Your love will set me free.


Read more about forgiveness at discoveryseries.org/hp071.

Even on the cross, Jesus forgave those who hurt Him.

INSIGHT:
In the first century, the common attire for a Jewish man included five pieces of clothing—shoes, turban, belt, loincloth, and outer tunic. After crucifying Jesus, the soldiers divided the Savior’s garments as their spoils for performing the task. After each took a portion of clothing, one remained—the tunic. This infers that even the loincloth was taken—and Jesus’s last shred of human dignity with it.

In a heartbreaking fulfillment of David’s messianic song, they stripped Jesus naked and then gambled for the tunic. In Psalm 22:17–18, where crucifixion was prophetically described some 600 years before it was invented, David said it would be so: “All my bones are on display; people stare and gloat over me. They divide my clothes among them and cast lots for my garment.” The soldiers gambled for all they could get, unaware of the fact that mere feet away Christ was freely forgiving and giving all He had out of love for them.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 08:29 AM   #2092
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Let Down Your Hair

Read: John 12:1–8 | Bible in a Year: 1 Samuel 19–21; Luke 11:29–54

Mary took about a pint of pure nard, an expensive perfume; she poured it on Jesus’ feet and wiped his feet with her hair. John 12:3

Shortly before Jesus was crucified, a woman named Mary poured a bottle of expensive perfume on His feet. Then, in what may have been an even more daring act, she wiped His feet with her hair (John 12:3). Not only did Mary sacrifice what may have been her life’s savings, she also sacrificed her reputation. In first-century Middle Eastern culture, respectable women never let down their hair in public. But true worship is not concerned about what others think of us (2 Sam. 6:21–22). To worship Jesus, Mary was willing to be thought of as immodest, perhaps even immoral.

Some of us may feel pressured to be perfect when we go to church so that people will think well of us. Metaphorically speaking, we work hard to make sure we have every hair in place. But a healthy church is a place where we can let down our hair and not hide our flaws behind a façade of perfection. In church, we should be able to reveal our weaknesses to find strength rather than conceal our faults to appear strong.

Lead me in the way everlasting. Psalm 139:24
Worship doesn’t involve behaving as if nothing is wrong; it’s making sure everything is right—right with God and with one another. When our greatest fear is letting down our hair, perhaps our greatest sin is keeping it up.

Search me, God, and know my heart. . . . See if there is any offensive way in me and lead me in the way everlasting. Psalm 139:23–24.

Our worship is right when we are right with God.

INSIGHT:
Worship can be an intensely personal and yet very corporate experience. We can worship alone, with a small group of friends, and with our local body of believers. Some of us dance, others raise their hands, some close their eyes and bow heads in reverence. There are many ways in which we can praise and worship God.

Mary offered her financial stability—pouring a very expensive perfume over Jesus, her physical being—using her own hair to wipe His feet, and her reputation—letting hair down was not something a “respectable” woman did in ancient cultures. Mary worshiped Jesus with everything she had. She knew who Jesus was and what He had done for her (He had just raised her brother from the dead; see John 11). Her worship was a response.

That’s what worship is—responding to who Jesus is and what He has done. How do you worship? How can you share your worship with another?
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 08:18 AM   #2093
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Forsaken for Our Sake
Read: Matthew 26:36–46 | Bible in a Year: 1 Samuel 22–24; Luke 12:1–31

God has said, “Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.” Hebrews 13:5

Does having a friend nearby make pain more bearable? Researchers at the University of Virginia conducted a fascinating study to answer that question. They wanted to see how the brain reacted to the prospect of pain, and whether it behaved differently if a person faced the threat of pain alone, holding a stranger’s hand, or holding the hand of a close friend.

Researchers ran the test on dozens of pairs, and found consistent results. When a person was alone or holding a stranger's hand while anticipating a shock, the regions of the brain that process danger lit up. But when holding the hand of a trusted person, the brain relaxed. The comfort of a friend’s presence made the pain seem more bearable.

Because of God’s love, we are never truly alone.
Jesus needed comfort as He prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane. He knew what He was about to face: betrayal, arrest, and death. He asked His closest friends to stay and pray with Him, telling them that His soul was “overwhelmed with sorrow” (Matt. 26:38). But Peter, James, and John kept falling asleep.

Jesus faced the agony of the garden without the comfort of a hand to hold. But because He bore that pain, we can be confident that God will never leave or forsake us (Heb. 13:5). Jesus suffered so that we will never have to experience separation from the love of God (Rom. 8:39). His companionship makes anything we endure more bearable.

Jesus, thank You for bearing the pain and isolation of the Garden of Gethsemane and the cross for us. Thank You for giving us a way to live in communion with the Father.

Because of God’s love, we are never truly alone.

INSIGHT:
The circumstances that took place on the night of Jesus’s betrayal seemed to be confused, chaotic, and out of control. But our Lord’s measured words in facing His betrayer showed His understanding of the big picture of God’s sovereign plan. Without the cross we could not be redeemed.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2017, 08:20 AM   #2094
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
At Home With Jesus

Read: John 14:1–4 | Bible in a Year: 2 Samuel 1–2; Luke 14:1–24

I go and prepare a place for you. John 14:3

“There’s no place like home.” The phrase reflects a deeply rooted yearning within us to have a place to rest, be, and belong. Jesus addressed this desire for rootedness when, after He and His friends had their last supper together, He spoke about His impending death and resurrection. He promised that although He would go away, He would come back for them. And He would prepare a room for them. A dwelling-place. A home.

He made this place for them—and us—through fulfilling the requirements of God’s law when He died on the cross as the sinless man. He assured His disciples that if He went to the trouble of creating this home, that of course He would come back for them and not leave them alone. They didn’t need to fear or be worried about their lives, whether on earth or in heaven.

We belong with Jesus, upheld by His love and surrounded in His peace.
We can take comfort and assurance from Jesus’s words, for we believe and trust that He makes a home for us; that He makes His home within us (see John 14:23); and that He has gone ahead of us to prepare our heavenly home. Whatever sort of physical place we live in, we belong with Jesus, upheld by His love and surrounded in His peace. With Him, there’s no place like home.

Lord Jesus Christ, if and when we feel homeless, remind us that You are our home. May we share this sense of belonging with those we meet.

Jesus prepares a place for us to live forever.

INSIGHT:
This imagery of a prepared place in the Father’s house also brought comfort to Israel’s shepherd-king, David, who sang, “Surely your goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever” (Ps. 23:6). Like Jesus’s words in John 14, David’s words carry both a present reality and a future hope. The present reality of a life resting in the goodness and lovingkindness of the Father is directly linked to trusting Jesus in life’s storms (John 14:1). And the forever promise of a place in the house of the Lord is there to offer us hope when despair might become overwhelming. This is the rich sense of home that can be so wonderful. We will never fully and completely know the peace we long for until we find ourselves at peace in Him.

Are there situations in your life that make the reminder of God’s presence particularly comforting? Thank God for His goodness and loving-kindness.

Adapted from Discovery Series booklet Finding Peace in a Troubled World. Read it at discoveryseries.org/q1126.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2017, 08:32 AM   #2095
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Enjoy the View

Read: Psalm 148:1–6 | Bible in a Year: 2 Samuel 3–5; Luke 14:25–35

Praise him, sun and moon; praise him, all you shining stars. Psalm 148:3

Sunsets. People tend to stop what they are doing to watch them . . . snap pictures of them . . . enjoy the beautiful view.

My wife and I watched the sun setting over the Gulf of Mexico recently. A crowd of people surrounded us, mostly strangers who had gathered at the beach to watch this nightly phenomenon. At the moment the sun fully slipped below the horizon, the crowd broke out with applause.

You and what You have made are awesome, Lord!
Why do people respond like that? The book of Psalms offers a clue. The psalmist wrote of God ordering the sun to praise its Creator (Ps. 148:3). And wherever the rays of the sun shine across the earth, people are moved to praise along with them.

The beauty that comes to us through nature speaks to our souls like few things do. It not only has the capacity to stop us in our tracks and captivate our attention, it also has the power to turn our focus to the Maker of beauty itself.

The wonder of God’s vast creation can cause us to pause and remember what’s truly important. Ultimately, it reminds us that there is a Creator behind the stunning entrance and exit of the day, One who so loved the world He made that He entered it in order to redeem and restore it.

I enjoy the world You have created with its variety and color. You and what You have made are awesome, Lord!


Our Daily Bread welcomes writer Jeff Olson! Meet Jeff and all our authors at odb.org/all-authors.

Join God in taking delight in all that He has made.

INSIGHT:
The heavens and the skies testify to the existence, power, greatness, and wisdom of our Creator. Nature praises and proclaims the majesty of God. If creation is so delightful, our Creator must be even more captivating, truly deserving our adoration and worship. The apostle Paul too affirmed that God has revealed Himself through His creation: “For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made” (Rom. 1:20). Even as we enjoy the beauty of creation, let’s worship its Creator.

This week, why not take time to visit a garden or a park—to see the beauty of creation, to smell the flowers, and to see the God who created all things beautiful.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2017, 12:35 PM   #2096
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Sweet Scent

Read: 2 Corinthians 2:14–16 | Bible in a Year: 2 Samuel 6–8; Luke 15:1–10

Thanks be to God, who . . . uses us to spread the aroma of the knowledge of him everywhere. 2 Corinthians 2:14

Author Rita Snowden tells a delightful story about visiting a small village in Dover, England. Sitting outside a café one afternoon enjoying a cup of tea, she became aware of a beautiful scent. Rita asked a waiter where it was coming from, and was told it was the people she could see passing by. Most of the villagers were employed at a nearby perfume factory. As they walked home, they carried the fragrance that permeated their clothes out into the street.

What a beautiful image of the Christian life! As the apostle Paul says, we are the aroma of Christ, spreading His fragrance everywhere (2 Cor. 2:15). Paul uses the image of a king returning from battle, his soldiers and captives in tow, wafting the smell of celebratory incense in the air, declaring the king’s greatness (v. 14).

Lord Jesus, make us carriers and communicators of Your beauty.
We spread the aroma of Christ in two ways. First, through our words: telling others about the One who is beautiful. Second, through our lives: doing deeds of Christlike sacrifice (Eph. 5:1–2). While not everyone will appreciate the divine fragrance we share, it will bring life to many.

Rita Snowden caught a scent and was driven to seek its source. As we follow Jesus we too become permeated with His fragrance, and we carry His aroma into the streets through our words and deeds.

Lord Jesus, make us carriers and communicators of Your beauty to the people in our homes, offices, and neighborhoods.

We are the aroma of Christ to others.

INSIGHT:
When a Roman general won a significant victory, he would be granted the honor of a triumphal parade in the streets of Rome. Citizens of Rome would line the streets and shout words of praise. Pagan temples would offer up fragrant incense that flooded the parade with sweet-smelling aromas in honor of the event. Paul uses this imagery to stunningly illustrate the spiritual victory of Christ in securing our redemption. Having won the victory over sin and death, Jesus is our triumphant leader. The spiritual aroma of Christ is sensed by the spiritual condition of those we encounter. For those who are to be saved, new life in Christ carries spiritual vitality. But for those who reject God’s light, the aroma is objectionable.

What are some ways you can spread the aroma of Christ to others?
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2017, 08:24 AM   #2097
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Letting Go

Read: Genesis 12:1–9 | Bible in a Year: 2 Samuel 9–11; Luke 15:11–32

The Lord had said to Abram, “Go . . . to the land I will show you.” Genesis 12:1

For our wedding anniversary, my husband borrowed a tandem bike so we could enjoy a romantic adventure together. As we began to pedal on our way, I quickly realized that as the rider on the back my vision of the road ahead was eclipsed by my husband’s broad shoulders. Also, my handlebars were fixed; they didn’t affect the steering of our bike. Only the front handlebars determined our direction; mine served merely as support for my upper body. I had the choice to either be frustrated by my lack of control or to embrace the journey and trust Mike would guide us safely on our route.

When God asked Abram to leave his homeland and family, He didn’t offer much information concerning the destination. No geographic coordinates. No description of the new land or its natural resources. Not even an indication of how long it would take to get there. God simply gave the instruction to “go” to the land He would show him. Abram’s obedience to God’s instruction, despite lacking the details most humans crave, is credited to him as faith (Heb. 11:8).

God can be trusted to guide us.
If we find ourselves grappling with uncertainty or a lack of control in our lives, let’s seek to adopt Abram’s example of following and trusting God. The Lord will steer us well.

Help me, Lord, to trust You with the uncertainty in my life.


What do you need to trust God with today? Share your prayer request at Facebook.com/ourdailybread.

God can be trusted to guide us.

INSIGHT:
Are you inclined to be a trusting person? Or does it all depend on how well you know the one who is leading you? It’s hard to know how much Abram knew about the Lord who asked him to follow Him to a new homeland. Many years later, Jesus asked a group of fisherman to follow Him (Matt. 4:19).

There’s a sense in which we’re all in the same boat when it comes to trusting the One who said, “Follow me.” Then as now, the challenge is to trust in God’s ability to lead rather than in our ability to follow.
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2017, 08:59 AM   #2098
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
The Gift of Giving

Read: Luke 3:7–14 | Bible in a Year: 2 Samuel 12–13; Luke 16

Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion. 2 Corinthians 9:7

A pastor breathed life into the phrase “He’d give you the shirt off his back” when he gave this unsettling challenge to his church: “What would happen if we took the coats off our backs and gave them to the needy?” Then he took his own coat and laid it at the front of the church. Dozens of others followed his example. This was during the winter, so the trip home was less comfortable that day. But for dozens of people in need, the season warmed up just a bit.

When John the Baptist roamed the Judean wilderness, he had a stern warning for the crowd that came to hear him. “You brood of vipers!” he said. “Produce fruit in keeping with repentance” (Luke 3:7–8). Startled, they asked him, “What should we do then?” He responded with this advice: “Anyone who has two shirts should share with the one who has none, and anyone who has food should do the same” (vv. 10–11). True repentance produces a generous heart.

Lord, show us what we have that we might use to bless someone else today.
Because “God loves a person who gives cheerfully” (nlt), giving should never be guilt-based or pressured (2 Cor. 9:7). But when we give freely and generously, we find that it truly is more blessed to give than to receive.

Lord, thank You for the many ways You bless us. Forgive us for so often taking Your goodness for granted. Show us what we have that we might use to bless someone else today.

Whoever refreshes others will be refreshed. Proverbs 11:25

INSIGHT:
God reveals His compassion for the poor throughout the Scriptures. In Psalm 72:13, we read, “He will take pity on the weak and the needy and save the needy from death.” The people were to join with God in bringing His compassion to the poor. In the New Testament, Jesus repeatedly expresses the Father’s concern for the poor by portraying them as accepted by the Father (Mark 12:42; Luke 16:20) and stating that His messianic mission, in part, was confirmed by His ministry to the poor (Matt. 11:4–5). Paul picks up the baton of this challenge by commending the churches of Macedonia and Achaia for their financial support of the poor in Jerusalem (Rom. 15:26), while James warns that the poor must not be disregarded because of their socioeconomic status (James 2:2–6).

If our God and His Son are this concerned for the poor, how can we represent that love by caring for those in need?
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 11:11 AM   #2099
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
The Small Things
Read: Psalm 116:1–9 | Bible in a Year: 2 Samuel 19–20; Luke 18:1–23


Every good and perfect gift is from above. James 1:17

My friend Gloria called with excitement in her voice. She had not been able to leave her home except for doctors’ appointments. So I understood why she was so happy to tell me, “My son just attached new speakers to my computer, so now I can go to my church!” Now she could hear the live broadcast of her church’s worship service. She raved about God’s goodness and the “best gift my son could have given me!”

Gloria teaches me about having a thankful heart. Despite her many limitations, she’s thankful for the smallest of things—sunsets, helpful family and neighbors, quiet moments with God, the ability to remain in her own apartment. She’s had a lifetime of seeing God provide for her, and she talks about Him to anyone who visits or calls.

God is the giver of all good gifts in our life.
We don’t know what difficulties the author of Psalm 116 was encountering. Some Bible commentaries say it was probably sickness because he said, “the cords of death entangled me” (v. 3). But he gave thanks to the Lord for being gracious and full of compassion when he was “brought low” (vv. 5–6).

When we’re low, it can be hard to look up. Yet if we do, we see that God is the giver of all good gifts in our life—great and small—and we learn to give Him thanks.

What shall I render to the Lord for all his benefits to me? . . . I will offer to you the sacrifice of thanksgiving (Ps. 116:12, 17 esv).

Praise to God comes naturally when you count your blessings.

INSIGHT:
This marvelous psalm celebrates the miraculous deliverance we receive from the God who comes to our rescue. Verses 1–9 recognize the call for help, the gracious response of God, and the praise and rest that come to us after a stressful time. Verses 8–9 also give us an eloquent summary of God’s deliverance: “For you, Lord, have delivered me from death, my eyes from tears, my feet from stumbling, that I may walk before the Lord in the land of the living.” These two verses are worth memorizing as a means of strengthening our faith, giving thanks for past help from God, and in preparation for future trials. Fear of death, tears of sorrow, and even stumbling feet find their comfort and restoration in the God of grace. All of these offer reasons to count our blessings.

For what can you praise God today?
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Old Today, 09:16 AM   #2100
GOLDDUSTERS5703

Name: GOLDDUSTERS5703
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: huffman, tx
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 2,382
Don’t Give Up

Read: Galatians 6:1–10 | Bible in a Year: 2 Samuel 21–22; Luke 18:24–43

Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up. Galatians 6:9

Bob Foster, my mentor and friend for more than fifty years, never gave up on me. His unchanging friendship and encouragement, even during my darkest times, helped carry me through.

We often find ourselves determined to reach out and help someone we know who is in great need. But when we fail to see improvement right away, our resolve can weaken and we may eventually give up. We discover that what we hoped would be an immediate change has become an ongoing process.


Share
The apostle Paul urges us to be patient in helping one another through the stumbles and struggles of life. When he writes, “Carry each other’s burdens” and so “fulfill the law of Christ” (Gal. 6:2), he is comparing our task to the work, time, and waiting it takes for a farmer to see a harvest.

Father in heaven, we ask for hope and perseverance to continue reaching out to others.

In prayer we call on God “who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine.” Ephesians 3:20

INSIGHT:
We may be hesitant about allowing ourselves to start feeling the pain of those around us. So did Paul lead us into more than we can handle when he urged us to reach out to the needs of others? (Gal. 6:9). Let’s put his words in context. In the previous chapter he wrote extensively about the importance of living with a sense of liberty (5:1). He didn’t see love as a matter of duty and bondage; rather, life in the Spirit is a life of care and concern for others, enabled by the Spirit.

So are we having cold feet about the implications of being warmhearted? If so, maybe we need to accept those natural fears. But in the freedom of the Spirit we can learn to act out of our own heart rather than out of duty; we can act out of the grace God generously gives us to care for others (6:4–5).
__________________
1997 CTD2500 "CASPER"

PHILIPPIANS 4:13
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:18 PM.

 


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2006 - 2017, CompetitionDiesel.com
all information found on this site is property of www.competitiondiesel.com