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Exterior Care Wash, Wax, Paint, Body, Buffing, and Polishing.

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Old 04-28-2021, 10:03 PM   #1
zstroken
 
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Polish compound

I need to do some polishing, not a fan of it, but picking up a car that needs some polishing done, and figure I could do some others. To be honest I want to be cheap about this. I would love to buy a milwaukee Dual Action M18 but they do not make one that I can find. So the next option I am thinking of is the Ryobi 10" basically this one.
Ryobi P435 One+ 18V Lithium Ion 10 Scientific


So any huge flags, I realize it isn't variable speed, but the cordless sounds like a win.


Also what kind of polish compound do people recommend?
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Old 04-29-2021, 08:39 PM   #2
ironmax
 
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I would stick with corded if your doing a bunch of polishing, but if your just hitting a few small areas they look like the way to go. I watched a dent removal guy do a few repairs on cars with a cordless Milwaukee buffer.
 
Old 04-30-2021, 06:22 PM   #3
zstroken
 
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I was more curious about the type of polish...
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Old 05-02-2021, 06:34 AM   #4
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If you have deep scrapes that need to come out, maybe some light color sanding on the clear coat to begin with, then you will need a rubbing compound. Gritty like a good pumice hand cleaner.
Next, go to a less abrasive compound. I know this one as "machine polish". It's not your final step, but really removes those swirl marks from the rubbing compound. Consistency of tooth paste.
Finally you want a hand glaze compound. Consistency of a watered down brown/tan looking hand soap. This will give a nice shine, all the scratches should come out nicely with this one, and car will look good under fluorescent lights.
Now you have a buffed surface with no contaminates on it. Apply a wax of your choice. I like to use a hand applied ceramic coat instead. Seems to last longer than a conventional wax.
I used this on my 14 chevy after some light buffing in a few areas and clay bared the whole truck. Applied over Christmas break of this year and the hydrophobic properties still exist and water beads up like I have never seen with wax.
https://exoforma.com/collections/cer...ray-coating-6h

So where do you find compounds? I purchase them from a paint supply store where we buy automotive paint, Tasco. The owners are very helpful when I ask for any sort of assistance or advice. They have the products that commercial body shops use. A good compound will be expensive. $40-$60ea.

Last edited by Red Sleeper; 05-02-2021 at 06:36 AM.
 
Old 05-02-2021, 09:32 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Sleeper View Post
If you have deep scrapes that need to come out, maybe some light color sanding on the clear coat to begin with, then you will need a rubbing compound. Gritty like a good pumice hand cleaner.
Next, go to a less abrasive compound. I know this one as "machine polish". It's not your final step, but really removes those swirl marks from the rubbing compound. Consistency of tooth paste.
Finally you want a hand glaze compound. Consistency of a watered down brown/tan looking hand soap. This will give a nice shine, all the scratches should come out nicely with this one, and car will look good under fluorescent lights.
Now you have a buffed surface with no contaminates on it. Apply a wax of your choice. I like to use a hand applied ceramic coat instead. Seems to last longer than a conventional wax.
I used this on my 14 chevy after some light buffing in a few areas and clay bared the whole truck. Applied over Christmas break of this year and the hydrophobic properties still exist and water beads up like I have never seen with wax.
https://exoforma.com/collections/cer...ray-coating-6h

So where do you find compounds? I purchase them from a paint supply store where we buy automotive paint, Tasco. The owners are very helpful when I ask for any sort of assistance or advice. They have the products that commercial body shops use. A good compound will be expensive. $40-$60ea.



I picked this up
https://www.autozone.com/wash-cleane...6oz/164697_0_0


Amazon.com: MEGUIARS M0216 M2 Mirror Glaze Fine-Cut Cleaner - 16 oz.: Automotive


Seems to do ok, I think I need a heavier cut, the hood has too many stone chips to do much good, thinking about just getting the hood painted eventually. It also looks like some sap damage has occurred. What happens with ceramic over stone chips? Really just looking to protect exposed metal.
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Old 05-02-2021, 09:33 AM   #6
zstroken
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Sleeper View Post
If you have deep scrapes that need to come out, maybe some light color sanding on the clear coat to begin with, then you will need a rubbing compound. Gritty like a good pumice hand cleaner.
Next, go to a less abrasive compound. I know this one as "machine polish". It's not your final step, but really removes those swirl marks from the rubbing compound. Consistency of tooth paste.
Finally you want a hand glaze compound. Consistency of a watered down brown/tan looking hand soap. This will give a nice shine, all the scratches should come out nicely with this one, and car will look good under fluorescent lights.
Now you have a buffed surface with no contaminates on it. Apply a wax of your choice. I like to use a hand applied ceramic coat instead. Seems to last longer than a conventional wax.
I used this on my 14 chevy after some light buffing in a few areas and clay bared the whole truck. Applied over Christmas break of this year and the hydrophobic properties still exist and water beads up like I have never seen with wax.
https://exoforma.com/collections/cer...ray-coating-6h

So where do you find compounds? I purchase them from a paint supply store where we buy automotive paint, Tasco. The owners are very helpful when I ask for any sort of assistance or advice. They have the products that commercial body shops use. A good compound will be expensive. $40-$60ea.



I picked this up
https://www.autozone.com/wash-cleane...6oz/164697_0_0


Amazon.com: MEGUIARS M0216 M2 Mirror Glaze Fine-Cut Cleaner - 16 oz.: Automotive


Seems to do ok, I think I need a heavier cut, the hood has too many stone chips to do much good, thinking about just getting the hood painted eventually. It also looks like some sap damage has occurred. What happens with ceramic over stone chips? Really just looking to protect exposed metal.


Any ideas on the color match wax?
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Old 05-03-2021, 01:29 PM   #7
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Click the image to open in full size.
This is what we use. I think at the time they were out of part B so we substituted.
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Old 05-03-2021, 01:34 PM   #8
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The links you posted are of a glaze. In my experience, those wont really cut to remove surface scratches. You need a compound with some grit, then use the glaze to buff the shine back.

TDR had great articles about this in this past winter issue.

If you care enough about the vehicle to touch up the rock chips on the hood, I have used this brand touch up paint with success. Then covered it with their small bottle of touch up clear coat. It's holding up sense applied over a year ago.

Touch Up Paint and repair | AutomotiveTouchup
 
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