Advertisement
If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Home Who's Online Today's Posts HP Calculator CompD Gift Shop Mark Forums Read
Go Back   Competition Diesel.Com - Bringing The BEST Together > Vendor Row > Sponsor Forums > Intelligent Engineering
Register Members List Timeslips EFI Live Library Invite Your Friends FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-05-2008, 03:00 PM   #41
morkable
 
morkable's Avatar

Name: morkable
Title: Just Over Broke
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Stony Plain, Alberta
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 5,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by Opie View Post
Kevin I don't know. Where are you blowing antifreeze out at?
Well it seems to be coming from the rad cap and the overflow. Just makes a mess all over. As long as I dont turn up the timing no problem.

Kevin
 
Old 10-07-2008, 01:11 AM   #42
Opie
 
Opie's Avatar

Name: Opie
Title: Ingenuity Director
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Federal Way, WA
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by morkable View Post
Well it seems to be coming from the rad cap and the overflow. Just makes a mess all over. As long as I dont turn up the timing no problem.

Kevin
I would hook up a pressure guage to the coolant to monitor what it is. But it sure sounds like it maybe a head gasket issue.
 
Old 10-20-2008, 09:45 PM   #43
Opie
 
Opie's Avatar

Name: Opie
Title: Ingenuity Director
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Federal Way, WA
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 363
I have taken several phone calls asking what I feel the correct coolant pressure should be set at idle. Lets just lay it out here, my system does not alter coolant pressure until after 2000 rpm. There is a weep hole that keeps that basically enhances regulator flow but that really does not alter below 2000 rpm any different than stock.
It seems wrong to lower coolant pressure at rpms lower than 2000rpm range. At idle there is only 8 –10 psi and while it does increase with rpms most trucks are not over 20 psi until 1800 rpm. After 2000 rpm is when the pump pressure starts increasing rapidly. All of the other systems out right now do alter the lower rpm coolant pressures.
If one wanted to lower lower rpm pressure why not just alter the water pump fins with a couple holes of grind/blend them down or easier yet under drive the pulley? I am totally against all them ideas myself, lowering the lower rpm coolant pressure is the wrong logic IMHO. Everyone has their beliefs and people will sell you about anything these days. Again, I feel the only true way to find out what system is best is to monitor temps and a pressure gauge in the cab while testing in various load/rpm scenarios.

Running an electric pump is fine for quarter mile passes but not the right answers for the greater majority of trucks as they just don’t offer enough flow/pressure for prolonged loads. Not to mention all 12VDC electric have a record of failure and if it does so there would be very little warning and ton$ of risk to engine damage. There are very good reasons why the factory engineers use a mechanical water pump.

Interested reading from the internet:
Mechanical energy
drives the pump; this can be taken right off the crank
with a belt as is done with a mechanical pump. In
the case of an electric pump, the power comes from
the alternator, which is driven from the crank.
Rather than the crank directly driving the pump, the
mechanical energy is changed into electrical energy
by the alternator, then the electric motor on the
pump changes it back into mechanical energy to
turn the pump. Since electric motors and alternator
are not 100% efficient, power is lost in this process.
So why do we see a little more power when
switching to an electric pump when they are less
efficient? The answer is simple; they do not pump
as much. The average electric pump flows under
35gph, where the average mechanical pump flows
twice as much.
If an electric pump flows enough for the
application, it can be an advantage. The biggest
advantage of an electric pump is that it can be left
4
running with the engine off to cool it off better
between rounds. If you have a really good electric
pump that can out flow the stock pump at low engine
speeds, then you’ll have a big advantage in stop and
go traffic. I have yet to see any electric pump out
flow a stock pump at higher rpm. If you plan doing
any road racing, where the rpm stays up for
extended periods, a mechanical pump is the only
choice. Drag racing is a different animal altogether.
You may only see 9 seconds of wide open throttle,
heat may build quickly, but an electric pump and
fans can run between rounds to cool everything
down. Remember, not everything you see on race
cars means it’s better for your street car.


Anyhow, after enough required pressure is being maintained for a safe boiling point temp, with my bypass coolant flow through the engine more than doubles at higher rpms. Which is great for cooling, keeping even temp across the engine, the water pump as it works less than half as hard freeing up some power and reduces steam pockets.

So now we will probably read somewhere that if coolant flows too fast it will not have time to pick up the heat. Sorry but that statement is not true as long as there is coolant contact the rate of heat transfer is the same.

The internet covers this point as well,

Nucleate Cooling Phase:
As coolant flows through the system it
absorbs heat from the engine parts that it comes in
contact with. As it does this some of the coolant will
boil and form tiny steam bubbles (absorbing a lot of
heat in the process) on the internal engine surfaces.
When these bubbles get larger they become a flow
restriction and the flowing fluid pushes them away
from the surface and that process starts over again.
The process is called the Nucleate Cooling
Phase. When the coolant boiling point is too low or
the flow rate is too slow, these bubbles can become
too large and form steam pockets that insulate that
surface from being cooled. This usually happens
around the combustion chambers, the hottest parts
of the engine. Once the steam pocket forms the
surface will rise in temperature (even though the
coolant is not overheating) and cause that part to
overheat, which can cause detonation and / or other
problems.


Hopefully this post has given the answers to most peoples questions on this coolant bypass.

Just like all the other improvements made for our trucks it’s just a matter of time before we see other kits come out using information from above, but… You read it here first!
 
Old 12-04-2008, 05:08 PM   #44
12valve
 
12valve's Avatar

Name: 12valve
Title: Diesel Boy
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: mexico
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 568
Just got the bypass kit today. my question: is there a reason why everyone installs it closer to the radiator end of the hose?

trucks got dual cp3s, i was thinking about installing the plug right in the elbow that holds the termostat down, for a cleaner install. is that a problem opie?

BTW i didnt get instructions...
__________________
96 3500 Dually Manual
Raptor Fuel Pump, 215 pump, no plate, Haisley 5K GSK, modded afc with spring kit, PDD 7mm DVs, Haley 5x.016 injectors, ARP head studs, 60lb valve springs, Southbend clutch.
 
Old 12-05-2008, 12:51 AM   #45
Opie
 
Opie's Avatar

Name: Opie
Title: Ingenuity Director
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Federal Way, WA
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12valve View Post
Just got the bypass kit today. my question: is there a reason why everyone installs it closer to the radiator end of the hose?

trucks got dual cp3s, i was thinking about installing the plug right in the elbow that holds the termostat down, for a cleaner install. is that a problem opie?

BTW i didnt get instructions...
Nope there is no reason, Bill at Source Automotive installed his around a foot after the thermostat houseing. Just make sure the routing doesn't kink the hose.
 
Old 12-06-2008, 01:09 AM   #46
morkable
 
morkable's Avatar

Name: morkable
Title: Just Over Broke
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Stony Plain, Alberta
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 5,956
Opie,, sorry I didnt see your answer to my post earlier. Help me understand why you think that would be a headgasket issue? When I put in the headstuds I put a new headgasket in. Do you think that I might have a pinhole leak or something? And why would it affect it when I turn up the timing?

Thanks for the help!!

Kevin
 
Old 12-06-2008, 01:56 AM   #47
Opie
 
Opie's Avatar

Name: Opie
Title: Ingenuity Director
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Federal Way, WA
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by morkable View Post
Opie,, sorry I didnt see your answer to my post earlier. Help me understand why you think that would be a headgasket issue? When I put in the headstuds I put a new headgasket in. Do you think that I might have a pinhole leak or something? And why would it affect it when I turn up the timing?

Thanks for the help!!

Kevin

Just my experiences with head gaskets todate. No matter what it is you should be able to figure it out if you pull the head gasket. I have went through a few head gaskets in my day. And have had freinds that have had bad heads too. My guess in your case is still head gasket, as for the timing question kind of makes sense you are changing the curve sort of speak of the cylinder pressure. I do not think the bypass will solve this, it may mask it but I think you need to trouble shoot this problem down...
 
Old 12-06-2008, 07:10 PM   #48
morkable
 
morkable's Avatar

Name: morkable
Title: Just Over Broke
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Stony Plain, Alberta
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 5,956
Gotcha.. I imagine it will exacerbate the problem too when I put the twin chargers on there too. I guess I will pull the head this winter,, thanks for your help, I appreciate it.

Kevin
 
Old 05-17-2009, 06:46 PM   #49
tirefrier
 
tirefrier's Avatar

Name: tirefrier
Title: Coal Train conductor
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Hollister, ca
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 320
what about the waterless coolants??

would you think theres benefits to running such coolants that do not make steam pockets. also do u think that there would be less risk of freeze plug pop out using this coolant alone. I only ask this cause they tell you that it can be a zero pressure system using this coolant. The product I am refering to is called evans coolant. I am also thinking of purchasing your bypass kit just wondering if this coolant is like cheap insurance or waste of money. thanks opie for your input here.dave
__________________
2007 5.9l 2500 MEGA 6"lift/ 37"tires/ 4.11 gears
FASS150-150/ stage 3 CP3/ II 100hp stick
Silver bullet tuning efi/coolant bypass/ Fletcher camshaft /j.wells tranny/Fletcher valve springs
62/71/13ss^s475
 
Old 05-18-2009, 01:15 AM   #50
Opie
 
Opie's Avatar

Name: Opie
Title: Ingenuity Director
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Federal Way, WA
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by tirefrier View Post
would you think theres benefits to running such coolants that do not make steam pockets.

Sure


also do u think that there would be less risk of freeze plug pop out using this coolant alone.


Not in the case of the our ISB Cummins as steam pockets are not the reason for the plug popping. It has more to do with the pressure of the water pump, the size of the freeze plug, how the block and plug where prepped, installed and amount of interference fit.

I only ask this cause they tell you that it can be a zero pressure system using this coolant. The product I am refering to is called evans coolant. I am also thinking of purchasing your bypass kit just wondering if this coolant is like cheap insurance or waste of money. thanks opie for your input here.dave

Is it worth the money? Guess that depends on what money is worth to you. There is nothing wrong with the 50/50 stock mix. Is Evens better? I would say yes but I can not justify the cost on any of my vehicles yet...
 
Old 11-13-2009, 10:43 PM   #51
cquestad

Name: cquestad
Title: Too Much Time
Status: Not Here
Join Date: Oct 2007
Member`s Gallery
Posts: 1,696
BTW...I know how to get "Evans" style coolant minus the name for $17 a gallon.

I run it in all race bikes...and the truck now too. 400 degree boiling point vs 275 at 0 psi...but I leave the OEM CAPS...SO IT IS EVEN HIGHER.

Bypass and coolant....no need for an overflow now!!!!!!!!!!
 
Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:56 PM.

 


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2006 - 2018, CompetitionDiesel.com
all information found on this site is property of www.competitiondiesel.com